“I quit my job for the first three months of this year and travelled with my husband. It wasn’t exactly a mid-life crisis, but it was definitely a point in time

“I quit my job for the first three months of this year and travelled with my husband. It wasn’t exactly a mid-life crisis, but it was definitely a point in time. I had just been going through the motions. Getting through day-to-day. And suddenly I realized that there were so many cultures and parts of the world that I hadn’t experienced first hand. I’d been on vacations—but never more than two weeks. This was something different. It was a long enough time that days drifted into one another. We couldn’t tell weekends from weekdays. There was no routine. We walked around a lot. We met a lot of great people. We were on a really tight budget, so we didn’t do anything fancy. But there was a lot of peace: existing in the moment, forgetting about the future, not getting caught up in the ‘what if’s.’ I had thought that three months would be enough to get the traveling bug out of my system. But then I came back to London, and I hit the rat race, and everything is driven by money. There’s always this feeling of not having achieved enough. Of putting in one hundred percent and still being behind. Of living toward a paycheck, knowing that paycheck will determine what you can do to be happy. I do want the security. I just wish I could retain some of that sanity I felt while traveling. It’s so hard to find peace in this environment. You’re being pulled by so many small things—things so small that you don’t even notice– until you step away from them completely.”
(London, England)

I didn’t want to be around it. I didn’t want to hear the yelling, or the fighting. So I ran away from the badness. I spent my childhood at the houses of friends

my mother is back home. She’s all alone. She’s growing old. And I don’t want to miss this part of her life. I’m not sure what to do. But I need to decide soon.